Fretspace

2 replies to this thread. Most Recent

neil whittaker

7 Apr 2019, 10:32 pm

[Fretspace] Cant' make bar chords

I just purchased this app to make good chord diagrams, and there are a couple things it cannot do that it should be able to do (or maybe I don’t know how yet).

  1. make bar chords, for instance a diminished 7 chord on the top 4 strings is fretted, for example: 4,3,4,3,x,x and you want to show that the first finger is a bar with a line connecting.

  2. Use symbols for chords, such as a ‘o’ with a diagonal slash through to represent a m7b5 chord, or a triangle to represent diminished chord.

Thanks. https://wayne.softpress.com/mailman/listinfo/fretspace

Jeremy Hughes

8 Apr 2019, 10:29 pm

Hi Neil,

Fretspace uses fingering to indicate bar chords. By default, it will show a 1-3-2-4 fingering (reading from left to right) for your example of an Fdim7 chord on the top 4 strings - but you can edit that to be anything that you prefer (e.g. 1-3-1-4 for a bar chord).

I have thought about adding an option to display “jazz-style” chord symbols, although I think that a triangle is normally used to indicate a major seventh (maj7) rather than a diminished chord, and a diminished chord is normally indicated with a circle. But there are also a number of different ways of writing jazz-style symbols: e.g. C△ and C△7 are different ways of writing Cmaj7 in jazz notation.

Jeremy

https://wayne.softpress.com/mailman/listinfo/fretspace

Back to Top

neil whittaker

25 May 2019, 11:44 pm

“although I think that a triangle is normally used to indicate a major seventh (maj7) rather than a diminished chord”

You are correct, I was writing quickly and made an error.

However, regarding the visualization of a bar chord. It can be a valuable part of a chord diagram because it allows the reader to position their hand without needing the fingering on the dots. Something I find useful for students. For example:

For an Emaj7b5, I recommend (and think many people do) playing this chord with both a first finger bar for the ‘E’, then a second-finger bar for the Bb and D#. However, there is no way to know that when the diagram can’t display the bar itself.